10 turn-offs for restless writers and pen-shy procrastinators

Writers don't get it easy. Most of us spend our working lives sat at a computer screen. The very thing that's supposed to help us write efficiently bombards us with distractions. But of course, it's not just technology that keeps us from our hectic writing schedules. We're surrounded by all manner of things that can't wait to help us procrastinate.

Below is my list of top turn-offs for writers. Feel free to use the comments section to share your own.

(Mostly techno-) time drains for writers

Okay, so the first part of this list contains some pretty obvious turn-offs. However, they're worth mentioning, because I'm sure we all fall into their inviting little traps from time to time. Some you may not have thought about before and the final two are, well, a little more personal and much harder to switch off. Onwards...

  1. Email Some people receive just a few emails a day, others get dozens. At work, I'm in the latter category and it can be a real distraction. I've recently taken to simply closing my email client. It's been a revelation. Try it. You can always load it up again at lunchtime or after an hour's worth of uninterrupted graft.
  2. Instant messaging and Twitter It's good to talk. Well, it is unless you're up against a deadline or you're struggling to write the final scene of your script. I write in short bursts and save my Twittering for 10 minute breaks or when I'm not busy. Come on, I know it's addictive, but turn if off!
  3. Mobile phone Obviously, if your wife's eight months and three weeks pregnant, or you're waiting for an urgent call from your literary agent, don't turn off your mobile phone. However, if you're not expecting anything drastic to happen, and you want a little uninterrupted time alone, just you and your keyboard, get it switched off.
  4. Music A lot of people write to music and swear by its ability to relax and inspire. Indeed, I will often have my headphones on when I'm doing more run of the mill sort of work. You know, head down, churn-it-out stuff. But if it's anything that requires a little more brain power, I turn off my iTunes and concentrate. If your music is any way distracting, turn it off.
  5. Television Come on, we've all done it. You've been meaning to write all day and are determined to get that last couple of paragraphs down, but flaming squirrels if it isn't your favourite programme about to start on the tellybox. Here's the truth: you can't write and watch television at the same time. Admit defeat and put your laptop down. Or better still, turn off the TV.
  6. Spell checker Who uses a word processing programme that very kindly points out all your typos and misspelt words within nanoseconds of you committing such terrible deeds? I do and it can be a real pain in the doo-dars. If you're sick of being pushed around by squiggly red and green lines, turn them off. Go on, they don't fight back. When you've finished writing (in peace), turn them back on and let them do their job. On your terms.
  7. Statistics This is a blogger-specific entry. Goodness me, it's tempting to refresh your blog statistics every 20 minutes, isn't it? And no good ever comes of it, you know. Whether you've had an extra 10 or 10,000 page views, it makes very little difference and you could quite easily get the same information an hour later, instead of when you're supposed be writing. Turn off your stats. Get some work done.
  8. Your computer, as in the whole thing These days, many writers work straight to screen. Personally, I like to make a few notes on paper (preferably) and then head for the computer. I find it quicker to type than write by hand. However, if you're struggling for inspiration or getting distracted (see 1-5), why not reverse the process? Print out whatever you've done, find a dark corner and scribble your notes in the margin. Oh, and remember to take a highlighter pen - an essential tool for writers.
  9. Friends and family We all have responsibilities and you can't write every second of every day, but if you need to tell everyone to shove off for a couple of hours, do it. Generally speaking, writing is a fairly solitary process. It's not your fault. That's just the way it is. Turn them off. Even if you can't find the switches.
  10. Your inhibitions Many people argue that the only way to beat writer's block is to just write. Write anything. Hopefully, you'll scramble your way out of whatever mental hole you're in and everything will be a-okay. But what about those people who procrastinate because they're scared that what they'll write won't be good enough? I've done it. I've sat at my computer completely petrified to the point of, frankly, not doing anything. There really is only one thing you can do. Turn off your inhibitions - all those negative thoughts - and write. Write, write, write!

Get involved

We all have our different distractions and things we really should avoid when we're writing. What are your turn-offs? How do you protect yourself from the ever-present lure of procrastination?